Bleachers - Gone Now

Die erste Vorladung (II)

In New York City lebt der aus New Jersey stammende, 33-jährige Musiker, Singer/Songwriter, Produzent Jack Antonoff, der nicht nur Mitglied bei den Bands Steel Train und Fun war/ist, sondern auch das Projekt Bleachers betreibt. Für den Song „We Are Young“ (Fun feat. Janelle Monáe) und seinen Beitrag zum Taylor Swift Album „1989“ wurde er mit dem Grammy Award ausgezeichnet.

Nachdem Jack Antonoff unter dem Bandnamen Bleachers 2014 das Album „Strange Desire“ veröffentlicht hatte erschien mit „Terrible Thrills Vol. 2“ ein Cover-Album, auf dem sich Charli XCX, Carly Rae Jepsen, Sia u.a. den Songs annahmen. Seit diesem Monat steht mit „Gone Now“ das zweite Album von Bleachers in den Plattenläden, das dem Konzept des erfolgreichen „Strange Desire“ (USA #11, Kanada #19) treu bleibt und zahlreiche namhafte Produzenten wie Emile Haynie (Lana del Rey, Bruno Mars), John Hill (MIA, Shakira, BANKS), Greg Kurstin (Adele, Sia, Kelly Clarkson) oder Vince Clarke (Depeche Mode, Yazoo, Erasure) integriert und auf die Zusammenarbeit mit Lorde ("Don't Take the Money"), Carly Rae Jepsen oder Julia Michaels ("Hate That You Know Me") setzt. 

„Don’t Take The Money“ ist der offensichtliche Hit auf „Gone Now“, dafür sorgen allein die Paten Lorde, Greg Kurstin, Vince Clarke und Lena Dunham („Girls“), die nicht nur Antonoffs Freundin ist, sondern auch beim Video Regie führte. Andere Songs, wie „All My Heroes“, „Let’s Get Married“ oder „I Miss Those Days“ lassen die 80er Jahre-Referenzen und John Hughes-Film-Assoziationen noch deutlich hervortreten. Leider gibt es auch die ein oder andere Verbeugung vorm Zeitgeist („Goodbye“ und „Foreign Girls“ mit nervigem Autotune-Einsatz), die den schönen Retro-Touch etwas beschädigen. 

„Gone Now“ steht aktuell bei Metacritic bei 70/100 Punkten:

On ‘Strange Desire’, Antonoff excelled in making epic pop songs – the kind that could make even the tiniest of dive bars feel like a cavernous stadium. ‘Gone Now’ shows he hasn’t lost that knack, but he also explores a subtler, more keenly focused approach. ‘Good Morning’ is a brilliantly disorientating piece of piano-pop, sounds flying from one ear to the other. ‘All My Heroes Got Tired’, meanwhile, is perhaps the most minimal Bleachers track in existence. It slowly builds from a needling synth line and hushed vocals to a huge surge of sound, like a plane readying itself for that ear-popping takeoff, but never quite lifting off the runway.Despite the rest of Antonoff’s accolades – working with Taylor Swift, Carly Rae Jepsen and most recently on new album ‘Melodrama’ – ‘Gone Now’ proves he should be recognised as more than a writing partner or producer to the stars, but one of the stars himself.(NME)

Jack Antonoff’s effervescent synth-based confections, especially for his outfit Bleachers, are deceptively cheerful: They have a buoyant pop sensibility, but come weighted with an unmistakable sense of loss. For his new Gone Now (it’s all right there in the title), Antonoff continues his exploration of the tragic, life-defining events of his youth, which include 9/11 and the loss of his younger sister Sarah to brain cancer while he was in high school. That remorse pervades the whole album, heard especially on songs like “Everybody Lost Somebody,” where he turns it into a gospel spiritual, complete with impactful choir and horn accent. On “All My Heroes,” his regrets turn inward as he knocks himself around the room, promising, “I’ll be something better yet.”Unfortunately, poignant moments like these are so successful, they make some of Antonoff’s other, lighter efforts look shallow by comparison. In particular, a highly touted collaboration reunion with Carly Rae Jepsen, “Hate That You Know Me,” really needed to be fleshed out more beyond just repeating the title phrase over some electronic music-box accompaniment. In “Goodbye,” Antonoff sounds like he’s singing about changing apartments (“Goodbye to my upstairs neighbor / Goodbye to the kids downstairs”), a somewhat banal story of life’s shifting backgrounds that’s elevated only slightly by some sentimental piano. And in “I Miss Those Days” he attempts a world-weary tone that falls flat, especially coming from someone whose music feels so young.(The A.V.Club)

Indizien und Beweismittel:

Bisher nur in den USA.

Nun sind die werten Richter gefragt...


Ingo hat gesagt…

6 Punkte

Dirk hat gesagt…

Tolles Popalbum mit einigen Hits. Nebenbei sorgte der Mann noch für die Alben von Lorde und St. Vincent.
7,5 Punkte